Ireland Working Holiday Visa – Requirements and Application

Are you a university student or fresh graduate who wishes to obtain an Ireland working holiday visa? Can you come to Ireland to work for up to 12 months? Do you have what it takes to fulfill this dream?

Ireland permits university students and latest graduates to come to the country and work for as long as 12 months through an Ireland working holiday visa. Unfortunately, you will need to meet certain conditions before making it to the country. Again, you can obtain working holiday authorization at the Irish Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade to make it to Ireland through this visa.

What is an Ireland Working Holiday Visa?

Ireland enters a working holiday contract with specific countries. With the agreement, people from the said countries can come to Ireland as tourists and work to augment their travel costs.

Thus, the primary reason for your trip to Ireland is to enjoy a holiday. However, the work you are to do is secondary. If your sole aim is to travel to Ireland to work and study, this visa is not ideal for you.

In addition, Ireland working holiday visa is available for up to one year or 24 months for Canadian citizens. The slots available for this visa are only a handful of people, and you must live outside Ireland to qualify. Moreover, you will work under the Working Holiday Authorization program. You will also register at the Irish immigration office when you arrive. They will issue you a resident permit on the success of your registration. Moreover, this permit qualifies you to remain and work in the country for the duration of the visa.

Are you eligible to work in Ireland under the Working Holiday Visa?

Technically, the visa scheme is intended for young people who plan to stay in Ireland for up to one year or two years for Canadians. They will equally work for the duration of their stay. Presently, only ten countries are in this working agreement with Ireland. Again, the recipients must be of a specific age group.

If you are a national of the European Union (EU), European Economic Area (EEA), or Switzerland, you do not need a visa to stay and work in Ireland.

The countries whose citizens can work in Ireland and the age bracket include:

  • Argentina: 18 – 35
  • Australia: 18 – 35
  • Canada: 18 – 35
  • Chile: 18 – 30
  • Hong Kong: 18 – 30
  • Japan: 18 – 30
  • New Zealand: 18 – 30
  • South Korea: 18 – 30
  • Taiwan: 18 – 30
  • USA: 18 – 30

What is the Eligibility to Work under this Scheme?

If you are an eligible candidate for Ireland working holiday visa, you must meet the requirements below:

  • Must be from any of the countries above
  • Have a valid passport valid for 30 months from the day you entered Ireland
  • Are not a recipient of this working holiday authorization visa in the past and must not apply again in the future
  • Have no criminal record
  • Can show proof of fund for the length of your stay in Ireland (up to €1,500, plus a return ticket or €3000 for the return ticket)
  • Show proof of visa fee payment
  • Have health and accident insurance
  • Cannot travel to Ireland with a dependent family
  • Can study a short program for not more than six months
  • Do not need to find a job before you can move to Ireland
  • Show proof that you are a student or fresh graduate of fewer than 12 months

Each country has a somewhat different rule from the other. You should visit the Irish website for more information.

What happens next after you enter Ireland?

If you satisfy the border control, your passport will be stamped, proving that you can enter Ireland. The stamping is valid for 90 days and more from the day you joined. Ensure to register with the Garda National Immigration Bureau (GNIB) at the immigration office within the period you entered.

If you fail to register early, you may be ejected from Ireland. Besides, the registration is the official proof that you can stay in the country for up to 90 days.

How can you register in Ireland?

Your location in Ireland will slightly determine the registration process you can follow. For instance, living in Dublin means you can register at the Burgh Quay Registration Office. You must book an appointment around ten weeks before the registration date.

If possible, book the appointment before coming to Ireland. If settling outside Dublin, you should locate the closest office to where you live. Most importantly, get in touch with the registration office to know when you can book the appointment.

Where can you apply for an Ireland Working Holiday Visa?

Aside from Taiwanese citizens who can apply at the Irish Naturalization and Immigration Service (INIS), other nationals will apply at the Irish embassy in their home country. In addition, the US has several destinations for the application. You will need to find out the closest one to you. Below are the Irish embassies in different countries:

  1. Argentina – the Embassy of Ireland in Buenos Aires
  2. Australia – The Embassy of Ireland in Canberra
  3. Canada – The Embassy of Ireland in Ottawa
  4. Chile – The Embassy of Ireland in Buenos Aires
  5. Hong Kong – The Consulate General of Ireland, Hong Kong
  6. Japan – The Embassy of Ireland in Tokyo
  7. New Zealand – Ireland’s Honorary Consulate in Auckland
  8. South Korea – The Embassy of Ireland in Seoul

Further, you may email the application form and supporting documents to the Irish embassy or drop them there yourself. For information regarding their working hours, you can visit their specific website.

What is the Processing Time for an Ireland Working Holiday Visa?

Typically, the processing time is around six to eight weeks. If your application satisfies the requirements, you will receive an email for the collection. More importantly, it will become invalid if you do not activate your Working Holiday Visa Authorization before 12 months.

How do you apply for the Ireland Working Holiday Visa?

Before leaving for Ireland, ensure to apply for your Working Holiday Authorization at the country’s embassy in your home country. If you are a Taiwanese, you must use the Irish Naturalization and Immigration Service and not the Irish embassy.

Further, suppose you are eligible for the scheme. In that case, you will receive an authorization you must go with when moving to Ireland. That is because you must show it to the immigration officers upon arriving in the country.

On your landing at the port of entry, you are to show yourself to the border officials. They will ask you for your supporting document and tell them why you chose to visit Ireland.

At this point, you must understand that even if you pass through every initial hurdle, you may not guarantee the outcome of this one. You must be able to satisfy the immigration officials with your explanations and proof of documents. If not, they may send you back to your country.

What will you do at the Registration Office?

It would help if you went along with your original Working Holiday Authorization and passport when visiting the registration office. Without them, you will not carry out the registration. To register will cost you €300. You can pay it through the bank or debit or credit card. After that, you will hand over your documents to the immigration officer, who will decide your eligibility. If you qualify, you will receive a fresh permission stamp on your passport, plus an Irish Residence Permit.

What is an Ireland Residence Permit?

If you have an Ireland residence permit, it is proof that you have been granted the authorization to live and work in Ireland. It also shows the kind of authorization you received. It would be best if you constantly carry your residence permit with you. If your registration takes place in Dublin, your passport will be stamped by the immigration officer before the end of your appointment. Again, you will receive your resident permit via post in ten working days.

However, suppose your registration took place outside Dublin. In that case, you will have to come to the office at an appointed date and time to wrap up the registration. On the second visit to the registration office, your residence permit must have been ready and stamped for you. Thus, you will pick up and leave.

How many hours can you work with your Working Holiday Visa?

With your working holiday visa, you can work full-time in Ireland. So, expect to work for as long as 40 hours a week.

Can you receive an Ireland Working Visa Extension?

Your Ireland working holiday visa does not have an extension. Once it expires, you are to head back home, or your stay will become illegal. Also, you do not qualify to apply for another working holiday in Ireland again.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is it easy to get a working holiday visa in Ireland?

You can quickly get an Ireland working holiday visa if you meet the requirements and prove that you are fit for the task ahead.

Can you receive an Ireland Working Visa Extension?

Your Ireland working holiday visa does not have an extension. Once it expires, you are to head back home, or your stay will become illegal. Also, you do not qualify to apply for another working holiday in Ireland again.

What is the Processing Time for an Ireland Working Holiday Visa?

Typically, the processing time is around six to eight weeks. If your application satisfies the requirements, you will receive an email for the collection.

How can I get sponsorship to work in Ireland?

You can apply to work with an Irish organization that provides sponsorship to non-EU/EEA citizens. After getting your job offer, you can apply for your work visa and then, work permit.

Conclusion

Obtaining an Ireland working holiday visa will avail you of the opportunity to live your dream. It is also another way of adding feathers to your cap and meeting up the relevant work experience for your resume. However, you cannot make headway if you do not meet the eligibility.

If you are a student or have any student who wishes to study in Ireland, check out this information on Ireland student visa.

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