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Things To Know Before Moving To Canada

There are some important Things To Know Before Moving To Canada. As preparation is been put in place for your relocating, there are some things you should know that are likely to be done differently than what you are accustomed to. It is good to be prepared by learning more about the country you are moving to in order not to be disappointed. Below are some of the things to know

Weather:

The weather condition in Canada is way different from that of other countries. If you come from a mild or warm climate, the bitter cold of a Canadian winter is sure to surprise you. Unless you’re living on the BC coast (or to a lesser extent, parts of Southern Ontario), you are almost certain to experience cold, snowy winters and hot summers, with short transitional seasons. Learning more about the Country’s weather will give you idea of what cloths to pack for your trip.

Diversity:

Canada has a culture that is different from what you are accustom to. You don’t need to let go of your culture or values while in Canada, but you do need to evolve so that you can successfully adjust and have the greatest chance of achieving success. Been open minded will benefit you, as well as those around you.

Tipping:

While in Canada, you must learn how to tip. This might come as a surprise to you but, Bartenders and servers generally earn minimum wage, which, depending on the province, is around $10 per hour. Indeed, some provinces have a lower minimum wage closer to $8 for service workers, on the expectation that they will earn tips to compensate, and staff usually have to give put tips to other staff (such as those in the kitchen), with a portion of their sales. When in Roam, act like the Romans.

The Job Hunt:

While in Canada, you should start researching, looking for and applying for job opportunities. This process can be very lengthy — perhaps much longer than what you are used to, as you establish connections in your new home. You can stay for many months before you land a professional position, so you  should plan accordingly to ensure your welcome to Canada goes smoothly. Fund is a very important aspect of things to put in place while preparing to move to Canada, fund is very important. This will keep you going before getting a job. Be prepared to take on a non-career job in the short term but always be on the lookout for your next career move. Most importantly, it is only wise that you begin to think and act Canadian before you even set foot in Canada. This simply means adapting to the resume format in Canada, networking and being proactive.

Cost of living:

Research is crucial. Learn more about the cost of living expenses in your new city before moving. If you move and are surprised by how expensive rent or transportation is, that’s not the fault of the city but yours. You failed to do a proper research.

Smoking:

Smoking in public is an offence. If you want to smoke, you are allowed to do so in your living space, your vehicle (unless you have a minor with you), and in the great outdoors. Smoking in places like restaurant, bar, offices, hospital, stores, as well as other places of employment is illegal.

Driving Licenses:

Many of the tests or examinations you have completed in your home country may not be valid in Canada, or may require paperwork in order to be converted. Driving licenses are a minefield for two reasons:

  • Firstly, licenses are awarded by the provinces, not the federal government, and individual provinces have their own rules and testing procedures.
  • Secondly, most countries in the world have particular agreements with the provinces. You must make sure the correct documents are gathered before your arrival in Canada.

Taxation:

Depending on your status and terms of employment, you may be entitled to a tax refund at the end of the fiscal year.

The Charter Of Rights And Freedoms:

It is advisable to know what right you have upon your arrival and throughout your stay in Canada. Certain political rights are guaranteed by the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedom, to Canadian citizens and civil rights to everyone in the country, from the policies and actions of all areas and levels of government. As such, the Charter forms the bedrock of Canadian political, civil and social society, and outlines the type of “welcome to Canada” newcomers can expect.

After you have received your call to Canada, what is the nest thing to do?

It is very important that you should always keep up-to-date with latest immigration developments, because changes happens regularly that can affect your move. Part f your research should include weather health insurance is free in Canada.

You can also see the 7 sure ways to migrate to Canada.